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Common Causes of Pelvic Inflammatory Diseases

The female reproductive system can get infected and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The uterus, fallopian tubes, etc ovaries are frequently affected when sexually transmitted germs travel from the vagina. Infertility is one of the long-term issues that PID can lead to if it is not managed.

What is pelvic inflammatory disease?

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a broad term for infections of the female reproductive organs. It is mainly caused by germs transferred through sexual contact. PID symptoms include lower abdominal discomfort, abnormal vaginal bleeding, temperature, and odd vaginal discharge. PID treatment often consists of antibiotics as well as may also need hospitalization

How do you know if you have pelvic inflammatory disease?

A pelvic inflammatory illness may be diagnosed in a number of different ways. The first is whether or whether your pelvic hurts. Your lower abdomen or your back may be the site of this discomfort, which can range in intensity from moderate to severe. If your vaginal discharge changes in any way, it is another sign that you may have a pelvic inflammatory illness. This discharge could smell bad or be thicker than normal. Finally, you can also feel feverish, chills, or nauseous.

The symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be ambiguous, making a diagnosis challenging. They might include lower abdominal discomfort, fever, strange vaginal discharge, and irregular bleeding.

It is crucial to consult a healthcare physician as soon as possible if you suspect that you may have PID. Although PID can lead to major issues, antibiotics can be used to treat it.

Who would be most susceptible to pelvic inflammatory disease?

  • Pelvic inflammatory disease is most likely to affect sexually active young women.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease is most likely to affect sexually active women who are between the ages of 15 and 24.

Risk factors for pelvic inflammatory disease

If you have gonorrhea, chlamydia, or have ever had an STI, your chance of developing pelvic inflammatory disease rises. PID, however, can manifest in people who have never had an STI.

There are many risk factors for pelvic inflammatory disease, including:

  • Unprotected sex
  • Previous pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Douching
  • Use of an intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Use of an intrauterine system (IUS)
  • Sexually transmitted infection history
  • A background in abdominal or pelvic surgery
  • A history of endometriosis

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease

Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease are absent in some female patients. Women who do have symptoms could go through the following:

 •Pain in your lower abdomen

• Fever

• An unusual discharge from your vagina

•Bleeding between periods or after sex

• Pain during sex

• Pain when you urinate

• Nausea or vomiting

Pain from pelvic inflammatory disease may be mild to moderate. However, some women experience severe discomfort and symptoms, including:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting

Complications

Pelvic inflammatory disease can also cause scarring inside the reproductive organs, which can lead to a blocked fallopian tube. This increases the risk of an ectopic pregnancy, which is a pregnancy that occurs outside of the womb.

If the pelvic inflammatory disease is not treated, it can lead to serious health problems, such as:

  • A pregnancy that develops ectopically occurs when a fertilized egg implants outside of the uterus.
  • Infertility – When the fallopian tubes have been damaged so that an egg cannot travel to the uterus for fertilization.
  • When the fallopian tubes have been damaged so that an egg cannot travel to the uterus for fertilization. Chronic pelvic pain – Recurrent pelvic pain that can last for months or years.
  • Recurrent pelvic pain can last for months or years. Pelvic abscess – A collection of pus in the pelvis that can cause severe pain and fever.

Tests for pelvic inflammatory disease

There is no definitive test for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Instead, your doctor will likely use a combination of tests to diagnose PID, including a pelvic exam, a Pap smear, cultures of vaginal discharge, and blood tests.

Diagnosing PID

If you have symptoms of PID and you’re sexually active, you should see your doctor as soon as possible. If your symptoms are severe, you may need to visit the hospital.

Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms, sexual history, and medical history. They may also perform a pelvic exam to check for signs of infection. They may order tests to diagnose PID or to rule out other conditions.

Tests for PID may include:

  • STI testing
  • pregnancy test
  • pelvic ultrasound
  • laboratory testing of your urine or blood
  • Your doctor may also order a pelvic MRI or CT scan to look for abscesses.

Assessing damage

If your doctor diagnoses PID, they may also run tests to check for STDs. If you have an STD, you’ll be treated for it. If you don’t have an STD, the doctor may test your sexual partner for STDs.

  • If you’re pregnant and have PID, your doctor may do an ultrasound to check for damage to the fetus.
  • If PID is severe, your doctor may need to do surgery to remove your fallopian tubes.

Ways to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease

The best way to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease is to avoid activities that can spread bacteria to the reproductive organs, such as unprotected sex. Other ways to reduce the risk of developing pelvic inflammatory disease include:

  • Use condoms during sex
  • Get tested and treated for STDs
  • Limit the number of sexual partners
  • To lower the risk of pregnancy, use birth control.
  • Utilization of an intrauterine device
  • Vaginal spermicide use.
  • Use of oral contraceptives
  • Preventive antibiotic use prior to sexual intercourse

Long-term complications of pelvic inflammatory disease

If you suspect PID, schedule a medical visit. For instance, the symptoms of a UTI may resemble those of pelvic inflammatory disease. Your doctor can do a PID test and rule out some other problems, though.

If you have pelvic inflammatory disease, you’re at risk for long-term problems. These include:

  • Infertility: PID can damage your fallopian tubes. This damage may prevent you from getting pregnant or may result in an ectopic pregnancy.
  • Chronic pelvic pain: PID can cause scarring in your fallopian tubes and around your uterus. This scarring can lead to long-term pelvic pain.
  • Increased risk of ectopic pregnancy: PID can damage your fallopian tubes. If you do get pregnant, there’s a greater chance that the pregnancy will be ectopic.
  • HIV risk is more prevalent: If you have PID and you’re exposed to HIV, you’re more likely to get HIV.

Pelvic inflammatory disease is a serious infection of the reproductive organs that can lead to infertility, chronic pain, and ectopic pregnancy. To avoid these problems, prompt treatment and diagnosis are necessary. It is crucial to see a doctor as soon as possible if you suspect that you may have PID.